Category Archives: Holy Spirit

Prophesy in the Church Age

In 1 Corinthians 14:1 we are exhorted, “Eagerly desire spiritual gifts, especially prophesy.” It is interesting that of all the gifts, this one is the least understood, accepted and practiced in the church today. Many Christians are bound by a cessationist view of certain spiritual gifts, including prophesy. This is a stronghold of demonic thinking in the church. This is exactly the type of stronghold that Paul is referring to when he talks about strongholds in 2 Corinthians 10:4-5. He defines these strongholds as arguments and pretensions that set themselves up against the knowledge of God.Those that teach that tongues and prophesy ceased at the end of the Apostolic age, based upon an erroneous interpretation of 1 Corinthians 13:8, are still “seeing through a glass darkly.” If the “perfect” has already come in the form of scripture, then what have we to look forward to? The purpose of 1Corintians chapters 12-14 is to provide divine guidance for the use of spiritual gifts in the church. One of the tests of divine inspiration is that the instruction is timeless. If the gifts were to cease in less than a century after Paul’s death, then why would the church bishops accept his writings as scripture hundreds of years after the Apostolic age ended?

What we need is relationship with the One who created us in His image. This relationship must include His manifest presence, which is more than words on a page. Books have been written to argue whether or not tongues and prophesy have ceased, so I won’t write another one. Suffice it to say that the world needs a prophetic witness to find God today.

The prophetic gift is probably one of the least understood of all the gifts. John Wimber taught that the gift of prophesy is available to all believers and is an anointing for the situation distinct from the office of prophet.  In the church today, one does not have to be a prophet to exercise the gift of prophesy and exercising the gift does not make one a prophet. Wayne Grudem, in his book The Gift of Prophesy In The New Testament And Today, gives as an example the prophetic ministry of Agabus to Paul in Acts, where his prophetic pronouncement was incorrect in a number of details and in his counsel of application. He refers to Agabus’ prophetic pronouncement in Acts 21:10-11, that the Jews would deliver Paul into the hands of the Gentiles. We see from Acts 2 1:27-35 that the details of his prediction were inaccurate. Grudem points out that by Old Testament standards, Agabus would have been condemned as a false prophet. Yet, Agabus is clearly recognized in more than one scripture reference as a prophet. Many, who believe in this gift, understand and practice it in an Old Testament fashion. The gift of prophesy in the New Testament has a distinct practice and function. Grudem points out that the Old Testament prophets who wrote scripture spoke the very words of God, as did the New Testament Apostles. He claims that New Testament prophesy has a different function and standard of practice. He teaches that in the church age, exercising of the gift of prophesy was never intended to be held up to a standard of infallibility.

Holding New Testament prophesy to a standard of inerrancy has resulted in much prophesy being judged as false and consequently discouraging the exercise of the gift. Because of its abuse, improper administration and misapplication, often resulting in serious damage, church leaders have squelched the practice of prophesy. Here again, this demonstrates a lack of faith in God manifested by a need to control His church.

Some, especially cessationists, have reinterpreted the gift of prophesy to mean only the speaking forth of God’s word in the form of canonized scripture. This wouldn’t seem like much of a spiritual gift, since anyone who is able to read could exercise it. On the contrary, the gift of prophesy involves telling forth God’s heart, His intentions and desires, etc., in the form of the “rhema” or living, active word of God appropriate for the time, person and place. In 1 Corinthians 14:25 Paul refers to an unbeliever coming under conviction when the secrets of his heart have been laid bare by a prophetic word. John Wimber explained the evangelistic exercise of this gift in his book Power Evangelism. He tells the story of receiving a revelation, in the form of what appeared like a tattoo on the forehead of a man he encountered on an airplane. God revealed to him that the man was involved in the sin of adultery. God used this revelation about a stranger to convict the man and John led him to Christ.

John Wesley wrote in his Journal: “Wed., Aug. 15, 1750- By reflecting on an odd book which I had read in this journey, The General Delusion of Christians with Regard to Prophecy , I was fully convinced of what I had once suspected: … That the grand reason why the miraculous gifts were so withdrawn, was not only that faith and holiness were well-nigh lost, but that dry formal, orthodox men began even then to ridicule whatever gifts they had not themselves, and to decry them all as either madness or imposture.”

When Christians begin hearing God, receiving revelation and responding obediently to the Holy Spirit, we will arouse the world’s attention. Then, when we preach the gospel it will be with great power and credibility.

Tagged , , , ,

The Transformation of the Mind

“Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind in order to prove by you what is that good and pleasing and perfect will of God.“ (Romans 12:2) Until recently, Christianity has been primarily a western world religion. Unfortunately, the world-view of the western world has been influenced predominantly by the scientific rationalism of the Greco-Roman and the European Enlightenment culture. This world-view de-emphasizes or completely denies the existence of the spiritual realm. In contrast, the world-view of first century Hebrews who wrote the scriptures was distinctly eastern, with an accompanying belief in the spiritual realm. The eastern mindset of early Jews and Christians did not require a scientific explanation for everything. Even though the Bible and Christian theology teach about angels, demons, spirits, miracles and a devil, most western Christians live as though they do not believe in such things.

But, this scripture teaches us that our ability to discern or know God’s will is related to the transformation of our mind. If we had a change in our world-view that allowed for spiritual phenomenon, including such things as supernatural empowerment as discussed in 1 Corinthians 12, we might be better able to determine God’s will. Without knowing God’s will how can we be obedient to Him? If we are not obedient to Him how can we fulfill the mission He has given us? Jesus claimed that He only did what the Father told Him to do.The success of His earthly ministry is attributable to His being in union with the Father and only doing what the Father was doing.

Once Christians begin to have the faith to believe in the spiritual realm and the supernatural, and we are in union with God, our witness will be accompanied by great power and our ministry will bear much fruit. Then unbelievers will turn to Christ in droves, because they will see that God is in our midst. Paul said that the Jews seek a sign.  That is a supernatural manifestation, and the Greek (ie. Westerner) seeks wisdom.This is in recognition of the divergent world- views. “My message and my preaching were not with wise and persuasive words, but with a demonstration of the Spirit’s power, so that your faith might not rest on men’s wisdom, but on God’s power.(1Corintians 2:4) Have you ever tried to convince a person that didn’t believe in God that God exists by rational explanation? When we transform our minds, begin to believe in the supernatural, cease conforming to the scientific rationalism of the world, begin discerning what God is doing and start being obedient to Him, many will be saved.

Tagged , , , , ,

Surviving the Passion

Christ's PassionTruly, truly, I say to you, He who believes on Me, the works that I do he shall do also, and greater works than these he shall do, because I go to My Father.” (John 14:12)

I remember walking out of the theatre after seeing “The Passion of the Christ” and hearing one man say, “No man could survive that.” My thought was, “Was he saying, as many believe, that it didn’t happen?” Or did he mean that Jesus was not a man and that He survived by His supernatural power? The answers to those questions have important implications for all of us.
Surviving

To the first point, the idea that Christ’s passion did not happen contradicts the historical accuracy of the gospel accounts and classical Christian orthodoxy as revealed in the scriptures. It did happen. The veracity of the gospels has never been successfully challenged. In accord with standard literary tests of historical accuracy for ancient documents, the gospels are unparalleled both in terms of the volume of manuscript evidence and the proximity in time of the manuscripts to the actual events. Christ’s crucifixion is also verified by a number of extra biblical contemporary historians, most notably Josephus. Additionally, we must consider the cost paid by the gospel writers as evidence of the reliability of their work. Would all of them suffer torture and martyrdom for a lie, when all that they had to do was recant? Not a single one changed their account. We should reject the notion that Christ’s scourging and crucifixion did not happen. The scourging is recorded in Mt. 27:26-30. It was a fulfillment of what was prophesied and recorded by Isaiah in chapter 53 of the Old Testament book of Isaiah, written almost 700 years before Christ.

To believe that Jesus endured the cross simply because He is God is to believe a half truth. We must not forget that Jesus came as God in the flesh. Christian orthodoxy teaches that Jesus endured the limitations of a man. He was and is completely God and completely man. The Genesis prophecy of His birth was that Christ would be of the “seed of the woman.”(Gen. 3:15) John’s testimony was that Jesus is the “Word made flesh.”(John. 1:14) (Note that the original text is “the Word” not “a word” from the Greek “Logos”, meaning universal or unifying principle, being a reference to deity.) Jesus claimed that He only accomplished His miracles by the power of His Father, that is, not by His own power. (John 5:19) He referred to Himself as the Son of Man to emphasize his humanity. The book of Hebrews reminds us that He was “tempted as we are.” (He. 4:15)

We need to understand, theologically speaking, that in order to satisfying the sacrificial requirements of the second Adam (He. 2:14-18), Christ had to come as a man and lay aside the privileges of deity, as explained in Philippians 2:6-8: who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation, and took upon Himself the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men. And being found in fashion as a man, He humbled Himself and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.” His humbling was illustrated in washing His disciple’s feet at the last supper. In forfeiting the privileges of deity, He refused temptations to use supernatural power for His own selfish needs. He rejected Satan’s invitation to use supernatural power to legitimize His identity. He rejected the mocker’s plea to remove Himself from the cross.

Jesus had no sin nature to battle with. But His ability to survive the passion as a man is attributed to the indwelling Spirit of God. Thus, the second option is really a half truth. He did overcome by supernatural power, but not His own. What is important to us is that Jesus promised that same supernatural power to those who would believe in Him. By cleansing the filthy temple of our mortal bodies by His sacrifice on the cross, Jesus made a dwelling place for the Holy Spirit of God. Other men did survive similar torture. History is full of miraculous accounts of Christian martyrs.  Jesus told His disciples they would drink of His cup of suffering.  (Mt. 20:23) All were martyred but one. Paul survived being stoned and had been given up for dead.  (Acts 14:19)

The Bible references the empowering, indwelling Holy Spirit as Christ in you, the hope of glory.” (Col. 1:27) Jesus promised His followers that, “you will do greater things.” (John. 14:12) Jesus did many miraculous things and he promised that we would do greater things! Those great things can only be done by the power of the Holy Spirit. The Bible promises that we can “do all things through Christ.” (Phil 4:13) That requires surrender to God’s will and death to self interest. Jesus said, “Whoever will come after Me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow Me.” (Mark 8:3)

Kiss feet

Tagged , , , ,